The Re-Education Of Medical Cannabis

Cannabis has a long history of being used for a variety of purposes, from hemp oils and fibres to medicinal purposes. It became acknowledged and accepted into American pharmacopoeia, where it was evaluated for treating diseases, or the accompanying symptoms, until the early 1940s. In 1937, against the recommendation of the American Medical Association, the U.S. passed the first federal law against cannabis. Dr. William C. Woodward, testifying Read more about The Re-Education Of Medical Cannabis[…]

International Relations: Cannabis & CBD Oil Continues To Find Support

Dr. Nora Volkow,

Dr. Nora Volkow, director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse in Bethesda, Md.

Dr. Nora Volkow, director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse, recently stepped forward to help clarify some of the misinformation circling marijuana and cannabidiol. As one of the world’s top experts on the application and misuse of cannabis and research, Volkow believes “what we can say with certainty is that cannabis contains active ingredients with potential therapeutic properties. In fact, the FDA has already approved medicines based on THC for the treatment of wasting syndrome and to control nausea in chemotherapy patients.”

While it may be a surprise to some that the FDA has actually approved products recognizing some of the positive aspects of THC, what shouldn’t come as a surprise is the support behind cannabidiol (CBD).

“There is also a great deal of interest in developing medications based on another constituent of the cannabis plant called cannabidiol” Volkow believes. “CBD, which does not give users the classic ‘high,’ has shown some promise in controlling seizures in children with severe forms of epilepsy (including Dravet and Lennox-Gastaut syndromes), and preliminary trials of a CBD-based drug are underway by GW Pharmaceuticals. There are likely many more applications for these other cannabinoids that are supported by a scientific rationale and some intriguing preliminary results that warrant more research.” […]